Sunday, June 11, 2017

Gold N' Silver Inn: Baked Lemonade Pork Chops


I think I drink more lemonade than is probably healthy.  I blame it all on Raising Cane's and their evil to-go jugs full of fresh-squeezed lemonade.  I rue the day I discovered that place.  In an effort to get that jug out of my refrigerator, I decided to use a bunch of it in additional recipe I acquired through another unhealthy habit: watching Guy Fieri.  I should probably stop throwing shade and thank the man for bringing such delicious pork recipes into my life.  These pork chops are great: tender, tangy, and delicious.  And they finished off the temptation that was sitting in fridge.  Bonus.

Baked Lemonade Pork Chops
Adapted from Gold N' Silver Inn, as seen on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives

Sauce:
2½ cups lemonade (reconstituted, not concentrate, or fresh)
¾ cups tomato ketchup
¼ cup soy sauce
¼ cup cider vinegar
¼ cup packed light brown sugar
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 tablespoon smoked paprika
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
1 teaspoon dried basil leaves

Pork chops:
Cooking oil, for the skillet
Four center cut pork chops (trimmed somewhat lean to avoid excess grease in baking pan)
All-purpose flour lightly seasoned with salt and pepper, enough to coat chops

For the sauce: In a large pot, mix all of the sauce ingredients together. Heat to boiling over medium high heat and cook, stirring constantly, until reduced by half.  Set aside.

Preheat the oven to 375°F.

For the pork chops: Heat a large heavy skillet over medium heat and add enough cooking oil to coat the bottom. Dredge the pork chops in the seasoned flour and cook until browned on both sides in the skillet, 5 to 7 minutes per side. Transfer the chops to a baking pan. Fan the chops so that each chop is exposed as much as possible.

Pour the sauce over the chops and cover the baking pan with heavy aluminum foil.  Bake until the chops are tender 30 to 45 minutes.

Makes 4 servings

Sunday, June 04, 2017

Wolfgang Puck: Käsespätzle


So I made some spätzle for the lovely Swiss dinner I cooked.  But it was about a metric ton of spätzle.  Which was about 2,204 pounds more than I really needed for that particular meal.  But if you've been raised properly, you don't through good spätzle away.  You smother it in cheese and caramelized onions and spend the rest of the evening sneaking to the fridge for fourths and fifths.  You have been warned.

Käsespätzle
Adapted from Wolfgang Puck

1 large sweet onion, sliced thinly
1 tablespoon canola oil
3 cups freshly cooked spätzle, tossed with 1 tablespoon unsalted butter until melted
4 ounces shredded Gruyère cheese

Heat the oil in a medium skillet. Add the onion and cook over high heat until softened, about 1 minute. Reduce the heat to moderately low and cook, stirring occasionally, until caramelized.

Preheat the oven to 400°F.  Oil a 9x9-inch baking dish. Spread half of the spätzle in the dish and top with half of the caramelized onions.  Sprinkle with half of the cheese, then top with the remaining spätzle.  Spread remaining onions on top, sprinkle with remaining cheese, and bake for about 20 minutes, or until the spätzle is hot and the cheese is just melted.

Makes 4 servings

Saturday, June 03, 2017

Swiss Hibiscus: Émincé de Porc à la Zurichoise (Sliced Pork Zurich-style)


It's confession time.  Let's just start with me saying that I rather dislike Guy Fieri.  He's just...too much.  Like he's trying too hard.  And his food is trying too hard.  Blah.  But I still find myself watching Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives with an excitement that borders on disturbing.  I love seeing what neat little hole-in-the-wall he digs up from viewers recommendations.  And one day recently, he went to this cute little Swiss restaurant, and the cute daughter of the original owner made some delicious Swiss food on camera.  And then I had a powerful need to eat that delicious Swiss food, convinced it couldn't be as awesome as it looked.  Oh, but it is.  I could eat this EVERY DAY.  Super tender pork, rich sauce, and my favorite addition (after bacon), mushrooms.  Gosh, I wish I lived in Portland, but this will have to do.

Émincé de Porc à la Zurichoise (Sliced Veal Zurich-style)
From Swiss Hibiscus restaurant in Portland, OR, as seen on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives

1 pound white mushrooms, sliced
4 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
1½ cups demi glace brown sauce
1¼ pounds pork tenderloin, sliced into thin 1x2-inch strips
2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon white pepper
¼ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup finely minced onions
¼ cup white wine
½ cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon finely chopped curly parsley

Sauté the mushrooms in 1 tablespoon of the oil until slightly brown, 3 to 5 minutes.  Set aside.

Heat the demi glace brown sauce per package directions (method may vary slightly depending on brand). Sprinkle the pork strips all over with the salt, white pepper, and flour. Toss gently to evenly coat.

Heat a large sauté pan over high heat and add the remaining three tablespoons oil. Once the oil is hot, add the seasoned pork strips and sauté until cooked through, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside.

Add the onions and mushrooms to the pan and sauté for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Add the white wine, brown sauce, and heavy cream; cook for about 1 minute more, or until the sauce is boiling. Return the pork to the sauce, let simmer for 30 seconds, then turn off the heat to avoid overcooking. Garnish with chopped parsley.

Makes 4 servings

Friday, June 02, 2017

Hsa*ba: Shwegyi Sanwei Makin (Burmese Semolina Pudding)


I know the picture doesn't look like much.  And yes, this honestly sounds kinda boring by US dessert standards.  But there's something appealing about a dessert that is soft and crunchy at the same time.  A dessert that isn't super sweet.  And I'm always on board with pouring heavy cream over something.  This pudding is hopefully just the first step in bringing some delicious Burmese food to this blog.  It's definitely a good start.

Shwegyi Sanwei Makin (Burmese Semolina Pudding)
From Hsa*ba blog

12 ounces semolina (preferably coarse grain)
12 ounces granulated sugar
1 (14-ounce) can coconut milk
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 large eggs, beaten
2½ cups water
½ cup peanut oil
1 tablespoon white poppy seeds

Pour the semolina on to a baking sheet or frying pan and roast over moderate heat or under the grill for 5 to 10 minutes. Stir frequently until the semolina has turned golden brown. Watch carefully so it does not burn. Remove from the heat and pour into a large saucepan.

Mix in the remaining ingredients, except the poppy seeds. Use a whisk to remove any lumps. Over a moderate heat bring the mixture to the boil, stirring continuously. Soon you will notice the mixture beginning to thicken and at the first sign of bubbles appearing, turn down the heat to the lowest setting.

You need to stir continuously throughout the cooking process. As the mixture becomes thicker, it can be hard work. Continue to simmer very gently for 8 to 10 minutes until the mixture starts to clump together and comes away from the sides of the pan easily.

Pour the mixture into a cake tin or an oven-proof dish, approximately 9 inches in diameter, which has been greased with oil. Smooth over the surface with the back of a spoon so it is level. Sprinkle the poppy seeds and place under the broiler for 8 to 10 minutes until the top is golden and some cracks appear on the surface. Serve the Burmese semolina pudding at room temperature.

Makes 10 to 12 servings